Selected Bibliography
 


Safety Management

Accident prevention through safety committees
Behavior-based safety management in Hong Kong’s construction industry
Quality and Safety Management Issues
Safety Culture Revolution
Safety Pays

Publications with abstract and full-text reference:

Impediments to the utilization of the available information for reducing or eliminating occupational risks
The Safety Element Method - A User Developed Tool for Improvement of Safety Management

Behavior-based Safety Management

Lingard, H. [1997]. Behavior-based safety management in Hong Kong’s construction industry. Journal of Safety Research, vol. 28/04, pp. 243-256.

Safety Committee

Go, H.H. (1996). "Accident prevention through safety committees". Asian-Pacific Newsletter on Occupational Health & Safety, ILO, Finland. Available Gopher: gopher://gopher.asiaoshnet.org/00/newsletter/newslet9/huat.txt. (February 8, 1998)

Safety Culture

LLNL (1996). "Safety Culture Revolution". Your Mining Co. Guide to Management. Available WWW: http://management.miningco.com/library/weekly/aa010698.htm (February 8, 1998)

Safety Pays

AN: a75815
TI: TOTAL SAFETY PAYS.
AU: Grayham-D
SO: Wrap. Jul.1991, 6-7.
PY: 1991
LA: English
AB: In context of the new philosophy that safety pays by reducing worker absence, various companies' safety training strategies are examined. Defensive driving courses have saved on fuel costs for company fleets for example. The total safety approach of Conoco (UK) Ltd. is described including: assault avoidance courses for women employees; substance abuse information; safety awareness among employees' children.
AN: a71164
TI: CONGRESSIONAL DEMOCRATS OPPOSE OMB MOVE IN LETTERS TO LABOUR DEPARTMENT, WHITE HOUSE. #
CA: Anonymous
SO: Occupational Safety and Health Reporter. 25 Mar. 1992, vol.21, no.42, 1419-1420.
PY: 1992
LA: English
AB: Discusses the Congressional Democrat's opposition to the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) decision which imposes broad new requirements on the Labor Department to weigh the costs and benefits of its regulations. These requirements assert that the cost of complying with stringent health and safety regulations may undermine worker health because of the regulations' effect on employees' income. The Democrats argue that investment in worker safety pays dividends for American employers. Under safe and civilised conditions long term employee productivity is increased and worker compensation and health care costs are diminished.
AN: a68352
TI: SAFETY PAYS OFF.
AU: Zanetti-R
SO: Chemical Engineering. Sep.1992, vol.99, no.9, 5.
PY: 1992
LA: English
AB: Editorial commenting on the success of the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Voluntary Protection Programme (VPP) launched in 1981. The programme provides employers the incentive to go beyond regulation in improving safety and health in the workplace. Once a firm applies for VPP, OSHA sends inspectors to the facility to see if what has been claimed in the application is actually being done. If the facility satisfies all requirements it gets a star rating and is evaluated every three years. Participating companies register 70 per cent lower injury rates and illness rates than the national average.
AN: a56126
TI: IS IT OSHA'S JOB TO SELL SAFETY?
AU: Tyson-PR
SO: Safety and Health. Sep.1994, vol.150, no.3, 27-28, 30.
PY: 1994
LA: English
AB: In many respects, promoting the financial benefits of workplace health and safety is acceptable. However, in many instances safety is not financially viable, for example, compliance with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) trenching standards and some toxic substnaces regulations are not likely to save a company money. The question is put, whether OSHA is focusing too heavily on the 'safety pays financially' concept of workplace health and safety, to the point where this concept is not always portrayed accurately.
AN: a56114
TI: IS PRODUCTIVITY RELATED TO SAFETY? THE CASE OF COAL MINING.
AU: Hopkins-A
SO: Journal of Occupational Health and Safety Australia and New Zealand. Oct.1994, vol.10, no.5, 431-438.
PY: 1994
LA: English
AB: It has recently been argued, using data from the Australian coal mining industry, that management attention to safety pays off in higher productivity and hence profit. This is an argument with far-reaching implications, for it supports a policy of self-regulation, as opposed to government-imposed regulation. This paper examines the evidence for the presumed connection between safety and productivity. It argues that the data have been entirely misinterpreted. 11 refs.
AN: a50143
TI: MANAGING HEALTH AND SAFETY PAYS IN THE CATERING INDUSTRY.
CA: Health and Safety Executive
SO: 1995. 2pp. (HSE information sheet) (Catering sheet no.4)
PY: 1995
LA: English
DE: Training-; Slipping-; Hot-surfaces; Dermatitis-; Enforcement-officers; Legislation-
AN: a49677
TI: SAFETY PAYS IN THE CATERING INDUSTRY.
CA: Health and Safety Executive
SO: Bootle, 1993. 4pp. (HSE information sheet) (Food sheet no.1)
PY: 1993
LA: English
DE: Accident-costs; Risk-assessment; Management-of-Health-and-Safety-at-Work-Regulations-1992; COSHH-; Control-of-Substances-Hazardous-to-Health-Regulations-1988; Workplace-Health,-Safety-and-Welfare-Regulations-1992
UDC: 641/642 : 614.8
AN: a46667
TI: SAFETY PAYS. A REPORT FOR SMALL FIRMS BY THE DIRECTOR OF FIELD OPERATIONS AND CHIEF INSPECTOR OF FACTORIES.
CA: Health and Safety Executive
SO: Bootle, 1990. 15pp.
PY: 1990
LA: English
DE: Accident-prevention; Small-businesses
UDC: 351.824.1 : 613.6 : 614.8
AN: a218138
TI: SAFETY PAYS - SIX BUSINESS REASONS FOR MANAGING HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK.
CA: Engineering Employers' FederationLloyds Bank Commercial Service
SO: London, EEF, n.d. various paging
LA: English
NT: presentation pack containing : presenter's guide; notes for participants; fifteen 35mm slides with hard copies for producing acetates
DE: Industrial-strategy; Management-; Manufacturing-industry; Costs-; Accident-prevention
UDC: 614.8.008
AN: a137952
TI: HEALTH AND SAFETY PAYS.
CA: Anonymous
SO: Health and Safety at Work. May 1982, vol.4, no.9, 34-36.
PY: 1982
LA: English
AB: The government intends to reduce the size of the Health and Safety Executive by 7.5 per cent by 1983/84, and under the pressure of the economic recession, many companies are similarly cutting back on resources they devote to health and safety. As a result more emphasis is being placed on analysing the cost of health and safety measures and the benefits which accrue.
UDC: 613.6.003.12 : 614.8.003.12
AN: a129311
TI: WHEN SHOP FLOOR SAFETY PAYS OFF.
AU: McKinnon-B
SO: Engineer. 18 Mar.1982, vol.254, no.6573, 61,64.
PY: 1982
LA: English
AB: Demonstrates how self-auditing commits managers and workers to safety, using the safety audit scheme of the Tube Investments group as illustration.
UDC: 614.8
AN: a124902
TI: THE ROSPA INTERNATIONAL SAFETY EXHIBITION, 19-21 MAY 1987. SAFETY PAYS ... ROSPA SEMINARS : MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.
CA: Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents
SO: Birmingham, 1987. various paging.
PY: 1987
LA: English
DE: Computers-; Standards-; Databases-; Microcomputers-
UDC: 025.3 : 613.6 : 614.8
AN: a100449
TI: USING MODERN TECHNOLOGY TO GAIN QUICK AND EASY ACCESS TO OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION.
AU: Pantry-S
LA: English
AB: Describes available online services, including hosts, telephone links, bibliographic and full text databases. Lists hosts and databanks, and types of documents retrieved. Covers CDROM (Compact Disc Read Only Memory) especially OSHROM (Occupational Safety and Health Read Only Memory). Describes the Health and Safety Executive Library and Information Service, including Public Enquiry Points, Prestel, area offices and publications. The author is a member of staff of the Health and Safety Executive.
NT: In "The Rospa International Safety Exhibition, 19-21 May 1987. Safety pays ... Rospa seminars : modern information technology", pp.1-21.

Quality and Safety Management Issues

Barrett, P. S. and Curado, M. T. (1996). Quality and environmental management: how should the construction industry face new panaceas? Proc. of the 1996 CIB Beijing International Conference on Construction Modernisation and Education. Beijing: CIB.

British Standards Institution (1992). BS 7850 - Total Quality Management. Part 1. Guide to Management Principles. London: BSI. British Standards Institution (1992). BS 7850 - Total Quality Management. Part 2. Guide to Quality Improvement Methods. London: BSI.

British Standards Institution (1994). BS 7750 - Specification for Environmental Management Systems. London: BSI. Burrows, P. (1991). In Search of the Perfect Product. Electronic Business June 17:70-74.

Canadian Standards Association and Deloitte & Touch (1993). General Principles of Management Systems, 3rd Draft. Rexdale: CSA.

Coble, R. J. and Kibert, C. J. (1995). The Environment as a Construction Safety Concern. Proc. 5th Rinker International Conference Focusing on Construction Safety and Loss Control:535-542. Gainesville: University of Florida.

Council of the European Communities (1989). Council Directive 89/391/EEC of 12 June 1989 on the Introduction of Measures to Encourage Improvements in the Safety and Health of Workers at Work. Brussels: European Commission. Council of the European Communities (1992).

Council Directive 92/57/EEC of 24 June 1992 on the Implementation of Minimum Safety and Health Requirements at Temporary or Mobile Construction Sites. Brussels: European Commission.

CSC-Construction Safety Council. Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry. 29 CFR Part 1926. Chicago: Commerce Clearing House.

Curado, M. T. and Dias, L. M. (1996). Qualidade nas Empresas de Construção, Marketing ou Realidade ? (Quality in Construction Companies. Marketing or Reality?) Revista Portuguesa de Gestão.

Dias, L. A. and Fonseca, M. (1996). Plano de Segurança e de Saúde na Construção (The Health and Safety Plan in the Construction Industry). Lisbon: IST/IDICT.

Duff, A. R.; Robertson, I. T.; Philips, R. A. and Cooper, M. D. (1994) Improving Safety by the Modification of Behaviour. Construction Management and Economics. 12:67-78.

International Labour Organisation (1988). Safety and Health in Construction Convention, 1988, N. 167. Geneva: ILO.

International Organisation for Standardisation (1994). ISO 9001 - Quality Systems - Model for Quality Assurance in Design, Development, Production, Installation and Servicing. Geneva: ISO.

International Organisation for Standardisation (1994). ISO 9002 - Quality Systems - Model for Quality Assurance in Production, Installation and Servicing. Geneva: ISO.

International Organisation for Standardisation (1994). ISO 9002 - Quality Systems - Model for Quality Assurance in Production, Installation and Servicing. Geneva: ISO.

International Organisation for Standardisation (1995). ISO/CD 10006 - Quality Management: Guidelines to Quality in Project Management. Geneva: ISO.

International Organisation for Standardisation (1996). ISO 14001 - Environmental Management Systems - Specification with Guidance for Use. Geneva: ISO.

Krause, T. R. (1994). Safety and Quality: Two Sides of the Same Coin. Quality Progress. October:51-55.

Levitt, R.E., and Samelson, N. M. 1993. Construction Safety Management 2nd Ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Marsh, T. W.; Duff, A. R.; Philips, R. A.; Robertson, I. T.; Cooper, M. D. and Weyman, A. (1995). Proc. 5th Rinker International Conference Focusing on Construction Safety and Loss Control:65-77. Gainesville: University of Florida.

Mattila, M. and Hyodnmaa, M. (1988). Promoting Job Safety in Building: An Experiment on the Behaviour Analysis Approach. Journal of Occupational Accidents. 9:255-267.

Sjøholt, O (1995). From Quality Assurance to Improvement Management: Project Report 1995. Oslo: Norges Byggforskningsinstitutt.

Wilson, H. A. (1989). Organizational Behaviour and Safety Management in the Construction Industry. Construction Management and Economics, 7:303-319.

Publications with abstract and full-text reference

Alteren, A. and Hovden, J. (1998). "The Safety Element Method - A User Developed Tool for Improvement of Safety Management". Safety Science Monitor. Volume 2, Issue 1, 1998. Available WWW: http://www.ipso.asn.au/vol1/issue3/w2p2v1i3.html (April 4, 1998).

ABSTRACT: The article presents the Safety Element Method and the process of developing the method. The method is an assessment and development tool for improvement of the safety, health and environment (SHE) management, tailored for application in the Norwegian mining industry. Development of the tool has been carried out through a structured group problem solving process. The participants were resource persons representing different parties in the industry. The Safety Element Method (SEM) is designed for being used by the practitioners themselves. The method identifies the current SHE performance and the desired future of the organisation. The tool also gives aid to find improvement measures. SEM emphasises consensus decisions through internal group discussions. The method is designed as a matrix, where the columns represent five phases of development. The rows define the safety elements considered. The content is devided in six main elements that ought to be considered by the organisation; Goals/ambitions, Management, Feedback systems/learning, Safety culture, Documentation and Result Indicators. Though the method has been developed for mining enterprises, the basic principles of the approach are relevant for other high risk industries. [To view the complete article please download the Acrobat file: v1i3art1.pdf.]

Indulski, J.A. (1997) "Impediments to the utilization of the available information for reducing or eliminating occupational risks" Safety Science Monitor. Volume 1, Issue 2, 1997. Available WWW: http://www.ipso.asn.au/vol1/issue2/w2p2v1i2.html [April 4, 1998]

ABSTRACT: This paper discusses some obstacles and uncertainties regarding the use of available information for the purpose of risk reduction or elimination. The author stresses that, in order to reduce or eliminate the risk, it is necessary to determine whether the risk is currently existing, or anticipated as a result of implementing new technological processes or starting new services; determination of the level of acceptable risk level is also required. Difficulties inherent in preparing a credible risk analysis have been discussed. The paper comprises several parts. Availability and reliability of the information indispensable for hazard identification have been analyzed. The system of collecting information on occupational exposure in Poland has been discussed, and its value and applicability for risk reduction or elimination has been assessed. Application of hygienic standards as the basis for occupational risk reduction has been critically evaluated. Conditions and requirements for undertaking preventive measures and actions resulting from the collected information on the effects of exposure to harmful occupational agents have been analyzed. [To view the complete article please download the Acrobat file: v1i2art6.pdf.]